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To many, Goa, a coastal locale which lies somewhere within western India, is a land where intoxicants such as Urrack and Feni are served a plenty in bars, whose structural real estate is generally dominated by posters of female “bombs” posing with misplaced pom-poms. To a 15-year old boy that I once was, Goa is but a land of unforgettable mischief –...

She sat there, white as snow, in the balcony of our house in Pali Hill, gently swaying in her rocking chair. Had her long needles stopped moving in her wool, one could have mistaken her for dead. She hardly moved or saw anything else – I do not remember when I last noticed her doing something else. When I went to office, she would be knitting and when I came back...

The leaves had long fallen from their twigs, the winter morning was cold. A gentle breeze would, once in a while, force a familiar looking stranger squeeze their coats a little tighter. At home, grandma would curse the weather, But then, she always cursed the weather – be it rain or shine. Little children dressed in colorful sweaters thronged the streets; the...

Posted on Jan 25 2012 - 2:46pm by Litizen

Nightmares rise from the depths. At least, that’s what Shivangi’s mother and father had explained to her. Shivangi always had nightmares; they visited every once in a while. They always greeted her with a friendly hello, and invited her politely into their land. When Shivangi refused, they turned vicious and snarly and their invitations were no longer asked, they were demanded. And so Shivangi obeyed, of course; she didn’t want to hurt their feelings! Nobody wanted their feelings hurt. Shivangi knew that for certain. She hated being...

Rocking back and forth with absentminded vigour, the surgical intern at King George Hospital was at war with the MCQ book he was bent over, squeezing in every last word.  He wondered from time to time what the point of it was.  No matter how many papers he solved, they always came up with new, unanswerable questions which everyone would invariably get wrong.  But then he would have to grudgingly remind himself that unlike his multiple choice book, he had no choice.  One couldn’t question decisions long since made.  Especially not...